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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
environment. thank you, mr. speaker. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> i rise today to talk about the recent passing of dick falla, a great friend to working men and women of illinois and iowa, and a great ally to american workers. dick spent his life fighting to improve the lives of others. he was a tireless and passionate advocate for working families and true champion for civil rights. st's a lifel heght for local d national leader on half of the american worker he showed up at every labor rally, pickett line, and civil rights event. rain, snow, heat, old age, and sickness. nothing could deter dick from fighting on he behalf of working people. he was a rousing public speaker and inspired generations of illinoisans and iowans to get involved in public service. i know my husband, jerry, and i extend our condolences to dick's family. he will truly be missed. thank you, mr. speaker an
easily to $2 billion in savings. $4.5 billion and will be spent a day to operate in that environment. when in fact you cannot go on the street with the exception of the package delivery, which will be done with dynamic routing, with a lower-cost employee, whether in the rural craft or city craft and allow us to provide that service at a lower acroscost. that is all money that can come out of the system. if calculated in what we think is the revenue loss, and we have talked to customers to validate that. we are terms of that. that we clear something up. people say it is only $2 billion out of $20 billion. if we had it this year we would break even. this year we will lose $1.7 billion on the operating line. as revenue,-costs, with the exception of a worker's comp costs and pre funding. we would make money if we made the six to five move at the beginning of this year. what happens with a $20 billion of that gap exists when you do nothing over a five-year period, and with inflation that continues to grow. when people say it is only 10% of the cost differential, it is not, it would make u
and energy activity in hat fast-changing environment. congress should ensure that the coast guard has the tools they need to do all we ask them to do. while our nation struggles with finding a responsible balance of fiscal restraint with a budget that meets our needs and responsibilities, i'm concerned about the nearly $1 billion reduction proposed in the coast guard fiscal year 2014 budget. last year we passed an authorization bill for the coast guard that authorized over $17 million more than the president's request would provide. it represented a
that hardworking employee. and we've got to remember that clearing this regulatory environment, it helps that american family. it helps that american family when they're sitting around their dinner table and they're trying to make life work. again, real quick, week of got a few more minutes. i just want to remind, mr. speaker, tonight we are hoping to receive input from our constituents at #makinglifework . throughout our conversation tonight we've been hearing from folks who have been reminding us of issues that are important to them and i think this is, mr. speaker, a very unique opportunity to have this onversation. ms. herrera beutler: we thank the gentlelady from alabama for putting this special order together and for really care being all americans and about what's important to them, as you said, sitting around the kitchen tables, it's about making life work. and at the end of the day, that's what government ought to be doing. getting out of the way, off their backs, working for the people, not against them. mr. gardner: i hope that tonight's conversation will continue, that it's n
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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